Rising debt and Hallyday tributes: your best comments on the Guardian today

Your reactions to a story on spiralling personal debt, an article on embracing sadness and tributes to French singer Johnny Hallyday are some of the conversations worth checking out today.

To join in you can click on the links in the comments below to expand and add your thoughts. We’ll continue to highlight more comments worth reading as the day goes on.

UK banks have 2m customers stuck in permanent overdraft




overdraft

More than 2 million people in the UK are stuck with permanent overdrafts. Photograph: Mark Hope/Alamy

Charity StepChange has warned of unaffordable lending in the overdraft market, creating a vicious cycle of debt. This story led many readers to share their thoughts and personal experiences of a system they feel is broken.

‘I didn’t consider the long term ramifications’

I have a £4k overdraft and won’t see the end of it anytime soon. As a younger man I saw they would keep giving me more and more, so I took it. Foolishly I thought that £40 a month was affordable – it was – but didn’t consider the long term ramifications.

Now they’ve upped the fees and I’m in the position where I need to save each month to clear it but lack excess cash to do so.

I only have myself to blame really but the fee change was a nasty surprise I didn’t expect. Perhaps they shouldn’t have allowed me to reach an overdraft that was about 20% of my salary, but still my fault unfortunately.
WalterCronkiteBot

Johnny Hallyday, the ‘French Elvis’, dies aged 74

Readers have been paying tribute to Johnny Hallyday, who has died after suffering from lung cancer.




French fan Andre Duval poses with a poster of late French singer and actor Johnny Hallyday in Marnes-la-Coquette near Paris on 6 December.

French fan Andre Duval poses with a poster of late French singer and actor Johnny Hallyday in Marnes-la-Coquette near Paris on 6 December. Photograph: Charles Platiau/Reuters

‘The Anglo-Saxon world cannot imagine how he towered over French music’

Saw him twice here in NYC at the Beacon. Absolute legend. The Anglo-Saxon world cannot imagine how he towered over French music. A treasure and an amazing stage performer right to the end. RIP Johnny and condolences to Laeticia.
NYBrit

‘I was taken aback by the power and range of his voice’

His records were played in the UK in the 70s but I guess there were so many home grown groups and singers it was hard to really break through. He seemed to be on a very long farewell tour over the last few years and I was lucky enough to see him live and close up. I was taken aback by the power and range of his voice, more akin to Tom Jones than any singer I can name, and it seemed everyone in the audience knew all the lyrics by heart. A very sad day for France and the francophone world.
Mothipa

It’s OK not to be OK: why we need to embrace sadness




happy and sad face

“In those early stages of sadness, I never quite knew what to do with the feeling” Photograph: Alamy

This piece by Johanna Leggatt has provided forum for many readers to discuss issues of sadness and depression, which it is careful to distinguish: “I don’t suggest depression isn’t a serious health problem or that it shouldn’t be professionally treated. But we should distinguish it from ordinary sadness.”

‘In today’s world, one is just not allowed to feel sad’

I suppose generations of people, have been told to ‘cheer up, it may never happen’. I mean, what is that about? How does that stranger not know that your cat may have just died, or your spouse just left you?

The importance of accepting sadness, and other less desirable emotions, is the affect of permission; to be allowed to ‘feel’ that emotion. In so doing, the sufferer is relieved of said undesirable emotion that much faster. In today’s world, one is just not allowed to feel sad, mainly due to superficial social media and their cock-eyed approach to a healthy reality.
nikinumnut

Comments have been edited for length. This article will be updated throughout the day with some of the most interesting ways readers have been participating across the site.