No Bed Of Roses, No Pleasure Cruise: 'Bohemian Rhapsody'

Let’s talk about the teeth. They’re impossible to ignore, that prosthetic ring of upper chompers worn by Rami Malek in the listless musical biopic Bohemian Rhapsody as he — and the film itself — lurches through all the now familiar, VH1 Behind The Music stations of the rock-music cross: discovery, meteoric rise, betrayal, precipitous fall, …

Police ask KPCC and other businesses to evacuate due to suspicious device

Pasadena police are investigating what they have described as a suspicious device found under a vehicle at the U-Haul rental facility located at the corner of S. Raymond and California Ave. Interim Pasadena Police Chief John E. Perez said evacuations of nearby businesses, including KPCC’s station in the 400 block of S. Raymond, were done …

Report: Women Everywhere Don't Know Enough About Ovarian Cancer

A new study of women with ovarian cancer shows that ignorance about the condition is common among patients in all 44 countries surveyed. And that ignorance has a cost. The disease is more treatable, even potentially curable, in its early stages. The women’s answers also suggested their doctors were ignorant. Many of them reported that …

In Japan, A Strange Sight: Cherry Blossoms Blooming In The Fall

In Japan, the springtime bloom of cherry blossoms is an annual rite of celebration, accompanied by picnics and parties under the flowering canopy. But this week, an odd thing happened: Some of the trees bloomed again. In autumn. Japanese broadcaster NHK reported that a weather company had received hundreds of reports of the trees blooming, …

Not Just For Cows Anymore: New Cottonseed Is Safe For People To Eat

You probably don’t think of cotton as food. There’s a good reason for that. Farmers grow it mostly for the fluffy white fibers that turn into T-shirts or sheets. Cotton plants do produce seeds, but those seeds are poisonous, at least to humans. This week, though,the U.S. Department of Agriculture approved a new kind of …

Novelist Esi Edugyan On Black Genius And What Comes After Slavery

At the beginning of Esi Edugyan’s new book Washington Black, it seems the narrator is not going anywhere. It’s the 1830s, and the narrator, a boy named George Washington Black, is enslaved on the British-controlled island of Barbados. He seems likely to be worked to death in sugar cane fields — until he’s carried away. …